Articoli

“Learning city, learning town, learning community e learning region” sono alcuni dei termini oggi utilizzati per descrivere un fenomeno che contraddistingue molte delle più importanti città del mondo occidentale e che traduce la consapevolezza che il nostro futuro dipenda sempre più dallo sviluppo del capitale umano e sociale disponibile. La possibilità di attrarre e formare questo tipo di risorsa si gioca molto sulla capacità di costruire quelle che vengono chiamate
«comunità dell’apprendimento»: società, adeguatamente attrezzate ed organizzate per autodeterminare il proprio sviluppo. Diventa quindi indispensabile investire in quelle facilities a servizio delle comunità del sapere che permettono di supportare e favorire l’accesso all’istruzione di più alto livello. Le residenze universitarie per studenti fuori sede rappresentano una attrezzatura in grado di unire società, cultura e servizi. Il contributo presenta – secondo l’approccio sistemico proprio della disciplina della tecnologia dell’architettura – il tema della residenza temporanea per studenti, prendendo in esame le differenti variabili che entrano in gioco nel processo di progettazione, costruzione e gestione di queste strutture: un approccio integrato che si propone di mettere in relazione scelte progettuali, considerazioni prestazionali, valutazioni gestionali ed economico-finanziarie insieme.

Ar.Tec – Colloqui.At.e 2016 “Mater(i)a” | Matera (Italia)

Essential support structures for access to higher level education, university residences have become, over time and also in our country, an interesting field of study and research. Recent Law no. 338/2000 and its implementing decrees which formed the basis of the National University Residence Action Plan may have improved the overall situation but they have also highlighted some limitations of the product and process, bringing to the fore the opportunity to proceed with further development of regulatory aspects, design, realisation and management, also on the basis of interesting suggestions that may be borrowed from similar experiences abroad. To increase the number of beds available in Italian university residences, in the hope of aligning ourselves with the educational systems of excellence, it seems strategic to build alliances and synergies between the world of university research and national entrepreneurship in such a way that, moving forward towards shared objectives, universities will be transformed into a valuable source of support for private operators and real estate funds, providing this potential market with concrete answers in exchange for acceptable results in terms of economic return. For these reasons, at the ABC Department of the Polytechnic University of Milan was formed the first work group to study the unique facets of this particular sector, investigating both morpho-techno-typological aspects and those related to management, economic and organisational matters. The objective of the contribution is to analyse – taking on the systemic approach of the discipline of architectural technology – the theme of university residences by defining the different variables and the contents that should guide the process of planning, design, construction and management. Based on the findings from a survey on the production of residential facilities for universities on an international scale, the researchers also intend to formulate a number of specific observations on recent regulations passed in our country, in regard to morpho-techno-typological requisites and performance of the building and plant systems, concluding with the presentation of financial and economic models that can help define the various hypotheses of economic feasibility, in relation to the possible operators involved in the construction process.

Residenze e servizi per studenti universitari | Firenze (Italia)

In the real state community, vacant space is mostly regarded as a cost and a negative factor. However from a societal perspective, vacant space might function as a necessity for growth and creativity. Vacant space is not merely relevant for companies and organisations, but also for residential areas. In order to satisfy space flexibility, companies and organisations must have access to additional space during periods of expansion as well as additional residential areas and other facilities for e.g. employees. Conversely, vacant space must be managed during times of recession. In current practices, space flexibility can be enhanced through efficiencies, ownership, relocation, leasing, and in a larger scale, through governmental and public initiatives. This paper presents new methodologies derived from strategies from manufacturing industry; which are here applied to identify vacant space and potential market. It has been discussed a certain amount of concepts for an efficient allocation of resources by relating to Facilities Management, Total Quality Management and ICT as a significant approach for rendering efficiencies in land use, particularly in countries characterised by scarcity of green areas and abundant “brownfields” are rather a topic for development. In a conclusive discussion, this paper argues that the identification of vacant space, in multiple perspectives, is crucial for the future for urban and regional planning.

CIB World Building Congress 2016 (WBC16) “Creating bult environments of new opportunities” | Tampere (Finland)

Progressively, the space demand of workplaces is modifying, together with the habits of workers. How can companies react to the change of perspective that is affecting the traditional ways of working? What does ‘Intelligent Built Environment’ mean for corporations? For several years at international level, it has diffused a new conception of the offices: flexible spaces, shared desks, informal areas that can accommodate different activities as needed. Even in Italy this phenomenon is spreading rapidly: some firms have started to abandon cellular offices and open-plan offices, and to experiment flexible work settings. A switch to a new conception of the office work can lead to the opportunity for modifications of space layout and the introduction of different solutions. Therefore, a new demand is emerging with specific characteristics. The most significant drivers seem to be economic efforts (big and expensive buildings affected by low daily occupancy) and organizational reasons (teamwork, part-time work, teleworking, network strategies, etc.). Nevertheless, even external factors such as competition, globalization and corporate image can influence the motivation for a change. The authors have collected data on new ways of working and workplace change in the brand new Italian headquarters of a company active in the technology hardware & equipment industry, with more than 1,200 employees. The investigation involved both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies. By matching the results obtained, it has been possible to elaborate some considerations regarding benefits and risks of flexible workstations and the way to integrate smart working into corporate real estate strategies. What kind of data is valuable to retrieve about the use of workspaces? Which methodologies would be the most suitable for such a scope? When and how should consultants support their clients? And, most of all, to which extent can an ‘intelligent building’ support the human activity in the daily life? The knowledge acquired can be useful to companies, both for managing the functioning of existing buildings and for orienting future projects towards the objective of becoming more ‘intelligent’.

CIB World Building Congress 2016 (WBC16) “Creating bult environments of new opportunities” | Tampere (Finland)

In the business world, the most important revolution to which modern man has witnessed, is the action that caused the gradual transition from an agricultural society to a society based on industrialized production of goods and products.
This “jump” has transformed the Western countries, has led to an increase in employment and dissemination of models of life-oriented “consumption”; but, above all, has transformed many large cities, because of the rapid urbanization determined by the lure of big business .
The same evolutionary leap is what characterizes the transition from a “service society” to an “information and knowledge society”; this, according to many observers, will lead to a substantial change in the concept of work.
It is knowledge, no longer work, the source of social wealth.
The growth of the countries is now determined by productivity and innovation, or the ability to translate knowledge into products, technical innovations and organizational changes, able to generate profit. The new workers, according to this view, then, are “intellectual workers”. In this scenario, the work, production and cooperation are free from a specific location. There are two elements mainly resulting from the scenario corresponding to the “knowledge society”, with regard to buildings and spaces: the first is connected to an overall transformation of all sectors and the progressive elimination of the distinction between goods and services, the second one is represented by what sociology calls “despatialization of work”. According to the evolutionary model proposed by the company’s knowledge, no productive sector in particular draws reasons and opportunities for growth, but all alike are influenced to a cross; design, production, management, distribution and consumption of a product are constantly connected, eliminating the concept of “workplace”.

“Design anticipation. When design shapes possible futures” | Trento (Italia)

This research, carried out by Polytechnic of Milan, has mapped out the offer available on the market with regards to the solutions of home and building automation systems applied to the building’s envelope and of the vertical closure of tertiary buildings, in order to highlight the automation solutions existing today and the development prospects that may arise in the future.
Keywords: Building automation, intelligent skin, building envelope designer, technological performance, automation systems, energy consumption.

11th Conference on Advanced Building Skins | Bern (Switzerland)

Gli operatori del mercato immobiliare internazionale sono soliti indicare con il termine “Grado A” quegli edifici che soddisfano i più elevati standard di qualità. Questa definizione, tuttavia, non è sempre accompagnata da una precisa, oggettiva e univoca individuazione degli elementi che la caratterizzano. I sistemi di valutazione adottati sono molteplici: diversi vengono applicati solo localmente poiché si riferiscono a requisiti e criteri che dipendono da normative locali; difficilmente vengono specializzati in funzione della destinazione d’uso. Se si escludono i sistemi di “etichettatura” dedicati al tema della sostenibilità ambientale, possiamo affermare che ad oggi non esiste uno “standard” per la valutazione delle prestazioni degli edifici (prodotti edilizi). E tutto ciò, inevitabilmente, si riverbera sul progetto. Procedendo da questa considerazione, il contributo descrive un modello/strumento di rating sviluppato dal Laboratorio Gestitec, dipartimento ABC del Politecnico di Milano, con il supporto di importanti partner privati del settore immobiliare. Ad oggi tale strumento è stato applicato su oltre 100 edifici in Italia (esistenti, da realizzare, da ristrutturare). A questo proposito, in particolare, si descriverà il caso della Torre Velasca di Milano.

Ar.Tec – Colloqui.At.e (2016) “Mater(i)a” | Matera (Italia)

“Learning city, learning town, learning community e learning region” sono alcuni dei termini oggi utilizzati per descrivere un fenomeno che contraddistingue molte delle più importanti città del mondo occidentale e che traduce la consapevolezza che il nostro futuro dipenda sempre più dallo sviluppo del capitale umano e sociale disponibile. La possibilità di attrarre e formare questo tipo di risorsa si gioca molto sulla capacità di costruire quelle che vengono chiamate «comunità dell’apprendimento»: società, adeguatamente attrezzate ed organizzate per autodeterminare il proprio sviluppo. Diventa quindi indispensabile investire in quelle facilities a servizio delle comunità del sapere che permettono di supportare e favorire l’accesso all’istruzione di più alto livello. Le residenze universitarie per studenti fuori sede rappresentano una attrezzatura in grado di unire società, cultura e servizi. Il contributo presenta – secondo l’approccio sistemico proprio della disciplina della tecnologia ell’architettura – il tema della residenza temporanea per studenti, prendendo in esame le differenti variabili che entrano in gioco nel processo di progettazione, costruzione e gestione di queste strutture: un approccio integrato che si propone di mettere in relazione scelte progettuali, onsiderazioni prestazionali, valutazioni gestionali ed economico-finanziarie insieme.

Ar.Tec – Colloqui.At.e (2016) “Mater(i)a” | Matera (Italia)

Atti di convegno

“Learning city, learning town, learning community e learning region” sono alcuni dei termini oggi utilizzati per descrivere un fenomeno che contraddistingue molte delle più importanti città del mondo occidentale e che traduce la consapevolezza che il nostro futuro dipenda sempre più dallo sviluppo del capitale umano e sociale disponibile. La possibilità di attrarre e formare questo tipo di risorsa si gioca molto sulla capacità di costruire quelle che vengono chiamate
«comunità dell’apprendimento»: società, adeguatamente attrezzate ed organizzate per autodeterminare il proprio sviluppo. Diventa quindi indispensabile investire in quelle facilities a servizio delle comunità del sapere che permettono di supportare e favorire l’accesso all’istruzione di più alto livello. Le residenze universitarie per studenti fuori sede rappresentano una attrezzatura in grado di unire società, cultura e servizi. Il contributo presenta – secondo l’approccio sistemico proprio della disciplina della tecnologia dell’architettura – il tema della residenza temporanea per studenti, prendendo in esame le differenti variabili che entrano in gioco nel processo di progettazione, costruzione e gestione di queste strutture: un approccio integrato che si propone di mettere in relazione scelte progettuali, considerazioni prestazionali, valutazioni gestionali ed economico-finanziarie insieme.

Ar.Tec – Colloqui.At.e 2016 “Mater(i)a” | Matera (Italia)

Essential support structures for access to higher level education, university residences have become, over time and also in our country, an interesting field of study and research. Recent Law no. 338/2000 and its implementing decrees which formed the basis of the National University Residence Action Plan may have improved the overall situation but they have also highlighted some limitations of the product and process, bringing to the fore the opportunity to proceed with further development of regulatory aspects, design, realisation and management, also on the basis of interesting suggestions that may be borrowed from similar experiences abroad. To increase the number of beds available in Italian university residences, in the hope of aligning ourselves with the educational systems of excellence, it seems strategic to build alliances and synergies between the world of university research and national entrepreneurship in such a way that, moving forward towards shared objectives, universities will be transformed into a valuable source of support for private operators and real estate funds, providing this potential market with concrete answers in exchange for acceptable results in terms of economic return. For these reasons, at the ABC Department of the Polytechnic University of Milan was formed the first work group to study the unique facets of this particular sector, investigating both morpho-techno-typological aspects and those related to management, economic and organisational matters. The objective of the contribution is to analyse – taking on the systemic approach of the discipline of architectural technology – the theme of university residences by defining the different variables and the contents that should guide the process of planning, design, construction and management. Based on the findings from a survey on the production of residential facilities for universities on an international scale, the researchers also intend to formulate a number of specific observations on recent regulations passed in our country, in regard to morpho-techno-typological requisites and performance of the building and plant systems, concluding with the presentation of financial and economic models that can help define the various hypotheses of economic feasibility, in relation to the possible operators involved in the construction process.

Residenze e servizi per studenti universitari | Firenze (Italia)

In the real state community, vacant space is mostly regarded as a cost and a negative factor. However from a societal perspective, vacant space might function as a necessity for growth and creativity. Vacant space is not merely relevant for companies and organisations, but also for residential areas. In order to satisfy space flexibility, companies and organisations must have access to additional space during periods of expansion as well as additional residential areas and other facilities for e.g. employees. Conversely, vacant space must be managed during times of recession. In current practices, space flexibility can be enhanced through efficiencies, ownership, relocation, leasing, and in a larger scale, through governmental and public initiatives. This paper presents new methodologies derived from strategies from manufacturing industry; which are here applied to identify vacant space and potential market. It has been discussed a certain amount of concepts for an efficient allocation of resources by relating to Facilities Management, Total Quality Management and ICT as a significant approach for rendering efficiencies in land use, particularly in countries characterised by scarcity of green areas and abundant “brownfields” are rather a topic for development. In a conclusive discussion, this paper argues that the identification of vacant space, in multiple perspectives, is crucial for the future for urban and regional planning.

CIB World Building Congress 2016 (WBC16) “Creating bult environments of new opportunities” | Tampere (Finland)

Progressively, the space demand of workplaces is modifying, together with the habits of workers. How can companies react to the change of perspective that is affecting the traditional ways of working? What does ‘Intelligent Built Environment’ mean for corporations? For several years at international level, it has diffused a new conception of the offices: flexible spaces, shared desks, informal areas that can accommodate different activities as needed. Even in Italy this phenomenon is spreading rapidly: some firms have started to abandon cellular offices and open-plan offices, and to experiment flexible work settings. A switch to a new conception of the office work can lead to the opportunity for modifications of space layout and the introduction of different solutions. Therefore, a new demand is emerging with specific characteristics. The most significant drivers seem to be economic efforts (big and expensive buildings affected by low daily occupancy) and organizational reasons (teamwork, part-time work, teleworking, network strategies, etc.). Nevertheless, even external factors such as competition, globalization and corporate image can influence the motivation for a change. The authors have collected data on new ways of working and workplace change in the brand new Italian headquarters of a company active in the technology hardware & equipment industry, with more than 1,200 employees. The investigation involved both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies. By matching the results obtained, it has been possible to elaborate some considerations regarding benefits and risks of flexible workstations and the way to integrate smart working into corporate real estate strategies. What kind of data is valuable to retrieve about the use of workspaces? Which methodologies would be the most suitable for such a scope? When and how should consultants support their clients? And, most of all, to which extent can an ‘intelligent building’ support the human activity in the daily life? The knowledge acquired can be useful to companies, both for managing the functioning of existing buildings and for orienting future projects towards the objective of becoming more ‘intelligent’.

CIB World Building Congress 2016 (WBC16) “Creating bult environments of new opportunities” | Tampere (Finland)

In the business world, the most important revolution to which modern man has witnessed, is the action that caused the gradual transition from an agricultural society to a society based on industrialized production of goods and products.
This “jump” has transformed the Western countries, has led to an increase in employment and dissemination of models of life-oriented “consumption”; but, above all, has transformed many large cities, because of the rapid urbanization determined by the lure of big business .
The same evolutionary leap is what characterizes the transition from a “service society” to an “information and knowledge society”; this, according to many observers, will lead to a substantial change in the concept of work.
It is knowledge, no longer work, the source of social wealth.
The growth of the countries is now determined by productivity and innovation, or the ability to translate knowledge into products, technical innovations and organizational changes, able to generate profit. The new workers, according to this view, then, are “intellectual workers”. In this scenario, the work, production and cooperation are free from a specific location. There are two elements mainly resulting from the scenario corresponding to the “knowledge society”, with regard to buildings and spaces: the first is connected to an overall transformation of all sectors and the progressive elimination of the distinction between goods and services, the second one is represented by what sociology calls “despatialization of work”. According to the evolutionary model proposed by the company’s knowledge, no productive sector in particular draws reasons and opportunities for growth, but all alike are influenced to a cross; design, production, management, distribution and consumption of a product are constantly connected, eliminating the concept of “workplace”.

“Design anticipation. When design shapes possible futures” | Trento (Italia)

This research, carried out by Polytechnic of Milan, has mapped out the offer available on the market with regards to the solutions of home and building automation systems applied to the building’s envelope and of the vertical closure of tertiary buildings, in order to highlight the automation solutions existing today and the development prospects that may arise in the future.
Keywords: Building automation, intelligent skin, building envelope designer, technological performance, automation systems, energy consumption.

11th Conference on Advanced Building Skins | Bern (Switzerland)

Gli operatori del mercato immobiliare internazionale sono soliti indicare con il termine “Grado A” quegli edifici che soddisfano i più elevati standard di qualità. Questa definizione, tuttavia, non è sempre accompagnata da una precisa, oggettiva e univoca individuazione degli elementi che la caratterizzano. I sistemi di valutazione adottati sono molteplici: diversi vengono applicati solo localmente poiché si riferiscono a requisiti e criteri che dipendono da normative locali; difficilmente vengono specializzati in funzione della destinazione d’uso. Se si escludono i sistemi di “etichettatura” dedicati al tema della sostenibilità ambientale, possiamo affermare che ad oggi non esiste uno “standard” per la valutazione delle prestazioni degli edifici (prodotti edilizi). E tutto ciò, inevitabilmente, si riverbera sul progetto. Procedendo da questa considerazione, il contributo descrive un modello/strumento di rating sviluppato dal Laboratorio Gestitec, dipartimento ABC del Politecnico di Milano, con il supporto di importanti partner privati del settore immobiliare. Ad oggi tale strumento è stato applicato su oltre 100 edifici in Italia (esistenti, da realizzare, da ristrutturare). A questo proposito, in particolare, si descriverà il caso della Torre Velasca di Milano.

Ar.Tec – Colloqui.At.e (2016) “Mater(i)a” | Matera (Italia)

“Learning city, learning town, learning community e learning region” sono alcuni dei termini oggi utilizzati per descrivere un fenomeno che contraddistingue molte delle più importanti città del mondo occidentale e che traduce la consapevolezza che il nostro futuro dipenda sempre più dallo sviluppo del capitale umano e sociale disponibile. La possibilità di attrarre e formare questo tipo di risorsa si gioca molto sulla capacità di costruire quelle che vengono chiamate «comunità dell’apprendimento»: società, adeguatamente attrezzate ed organizzate per autodeterminare il proprio sviluppo. Diventa quindi indispensabile investire in quelle facilities a servizio delle comunità del sapere che permettono di supportare e favorire l’accesso all’istruzione di più alto livello. Le residenze universitarie per studenti fuori sede rappresentano una attrezzatura in grado di unire società, cultura e servizi. Il contributo presenta – secondo l’approccio sistemico proprio della disciplina della tecnologia ell’architettura – il tema della residenza temporanea per studenti, prendendo in esame le differenti variabili che entrano in gioco nel processo di progettazione, costruzione e gestione di queste strutture: un approccio integrato che si propone di mettere in relazione scelte progettuali, onsiderazioni prestazionali, valutazioni gestionali ed economico-finanziarie insieme.

Ar.Tec – Colloqui.At.e (2016) “Mater(i)a” | Matera (Italia)

This document is aimed to provide a review of papers about innovation in housing market. Innovation of product, process and markets are the three categories to assess the improvement of a sector. This paper analyses solutions adopted by the international market in terms of definition of attributes of housing products, enlightening aspects linked to quality attributes of housing products and trying to read a common scheme in any study analysed to provide solutions to set innovation hints to enhance market innovation in the sector. The idea of choice, user and buyer categories definition, assessment and rating system is the backbone of the paper, as the parallelism between marketing of industrial goods and services and built environment objects. Quality of the neighborhood and the idea of an ex-post assessment is the theme behind the last case presented, based on a research made by ABC Department of Politecnico di Milano in a neighborhood in Milano, aimed to assess its quality.

Integration, Partnership and Innovations in Construction Science and Education | Moscow (Russia)

In contemporary architecture and on the housing market in general, the building envelope is no longer seen as a simple means of separating the outside from the outside, but has taken on multiple functions and purposes thanks to developments in the construction and building materials world, and has even become an autonomous element from the building in its own right. The building envelope has acquired a major role in the process of formal and technological architectural classification process, as it represents an urban catalyst and amplifier for architectural quality. The use of traditional materials-once used in accordance with classical architectural techniques-is distorted in the modern world both in regards to assembly and composition. In order to meet the demands of new architecture, builders have thought to reuse traditional materials by using the façade in new ways. In line with modern building culture, many innovative materials have been used, such as titanium zinc, Corten, metallic fabrics and others, which have been created for a new conception of architecture: one that is lighter, more transparent and easier to assemble. But it is with a greater focus on acoustic, energy and seismic performance of a building that envelope materials are changing and are increasingly becoming systems adapted to energy conversion, such as solar panels. Systems that are suited to reduced sound dispersion have been created in order to meet the new standards, while new building envelopes have been designed that can withstand earthquakes. The combination of all these aspects has led to a further change in how designers think, helping to develop modern architecture with building designs that are distinguished by increasingly complex forms. This has given rise to new systems that change and improve buildings, such as cell-based systems, double-skin walls, new types of shielding, LED lighting systems, media walls and new sporting envelopes. The paper presents a series of case studies that highlight the new building materials and technologies that currently characterize the most advance contemporary building envelopes.

41st IAHS World Congress “Sustainability and Innovation for the Future” | Albufeira (Portugal)

Several studies show that companies have a “general” approach to energy saving and that the resources are used in a poorly structured criterion: only the minority of companies are adopting specific strategies and sets measurable objectives over time. This approach generalized in energy saving, together with the perception of high costs for the construction/maintenance of solutions to improve efficiency, is the main barrier to the final development of the sector. It must be considered that in many cases, an entrepreneur not being able to assess in detail the technological solutions that are proposed, can be brought to make not appropriate choices, often partial and non-prioritized on the consumption profile of the company. In response to the previously enounced needs, the Department ABC of Politecnico di Milano has developed a tool able to offer an energy checkup of the whole system, with precise indications about the areas in need of interventions (at any level) in terms of energy (efficiency aptitude/priorities for action) and time of return on investment (range). The aim of this paper is to describe this too l and its applicative purposes.

41st IAHS World Congress “Sustainability and Innovation for the Future” | Albufeira (Portugal)

This paper is aimed to deliver a review of some techniques derived from other disciplines to enhance quality in the planning, design and maintenance process in Urban Areas. The definition of the driver of Information and Stakeholder (the number of subjects affected by the project’s effects during all its lifecycle) is as important as the definition of Sustainability idea according to the three carachteristics: Environmental, Social and Economical. Cultural driver, related to social sustainability is taken into account, advicing the decision maker to consider the use of the tools presented as potentially useful for their method but it is needed a strong effort of adaptation for any situation. Replicability of the model is one of the positive aspects of this approach as it improve quality and knowledge in all the subjects involved in the phases of the lifecycle of the object.

20th International Inter-University Scientific and Practical Conference of Young Scientists, PhD and
Doctoral Students “Construction as formation of human habitat” | Moscow (Russia)

Public Authorities have opened to the involvement of private operators in the processes of modernization and upgrading of both the infrastructural facilities (such as transport, road works) that the great works in the community services such as housing, tourism and health. The complexity of programming, implementation and management of these processes have encouraged the use of Public Private Partnership (PPP) and Project Finance (PFI) that result with the interaction between several public and private actors in order to share the risks relating to investment operations within the initiative and to draw mutual benefits. The main benefits range from greater consistency of the costs and the timing, to the involvement of qualified operators, optimization of design processes, production and management. The forms of public-private partnership are continuously evolving, now providing sources of finance unthinkable only a few years ago, ranging from the purpose taxation to the specific use of excise duties , especially for operations that affect the realization of works characterized by a limited profitability or in any case a return only in the very long period of investment, as exemplified by some important infrastructure.

41st IAHS World Congress “Sustainability and Innovation for the Future” | Albufeira (Portugal)

Le attività di valorizzazione degli immobili, rispetto le tradizionali attività di ristrutturazione e riqualificazione, rappresentano un approccio innovativo prestando particolare attenzione alle potenzialità di trasformazione del bene immobiliare in relazione al contesto e alle esigenze del mercato di riferimento. Il processo di valorizzazione ha come obiettivo fondamentale l’incremento della redditività attraverso la progettazione e realizzazione di una “nuova e precisa identità” dell’immobile. Particolare rilievo viene dato alle capacità intrinseche di flessibilità e ri-layout degli spazi interni per rispondere all’eventuale esigenza di cambio destinazione al fine di ottenere la massima efficienza di prestazione e di redditività.

Ar.Tec – Colloqui.At.e (2016) “Mater(i)a” | Matera (Italia)